about us:

There is no longer a maximum on capacity at our store. We require customers to wear masks in store at all times, and offer hand santizer at the entryway. If you have been symptomatic in the past two weeks, or exposed to anyone with COVID-19, please do not enter the store.

We also offer a contactless pickup option. Call us at (215) 563-4184 or use our website to place an order. We will prepare your order and collect payment prior to pickup. When you’re ready to pick up, please give us a call and we will bring your order to the door. We encourage customers to use this option whenever possible.

Gift certificates are available for purchase in store and online.  

If you have any questions, please check out our FAQ.

Sign up for our weekly newsletter here, to see new releases and signed book highlights!

Thank you for your support and patience in these unprecedented times. We will continue to reassess and update our policies in order to safely accommodate customers. We look forward to serving our community. Stay well!


We were Spotted by Locals* in Philadelphia! Read more about a visitor's experience here — thanks, Bronwyn.

Joseph Fox Bookshop is partnering with Reach Out and Read Greater Philadelphia to further the incorporation of books into pediatric care and encourage families to read aloud together. Donate books from this reading list by purchasing them from Joseph Fox.


Joseph Fox Bookshop was established in 1951 as a family-owned and -operated retailer of fine books; literary fiction, nonfiction, architecture, art, poetry, music, small press, and international literature; and books for children of all ages. 

It has been our joy to bring books to Philadelphia for the past seventy years. We hope to see you in our store sometime soon!

1724 Sansom Street  Philadelphia, PA 19103

Monday–Saturday 10:00–6:00

(215) 563-4184    /   mfox@foxbookshop.com

Joseph Fox, pictured above, founded the bookshop in 1951.

 

“'What shall I do with all my books?' was the question, and the answer, 'Read them,' sobered the questioner. But if you cannot read them, at the very least handle them and, as it were, fondle them. Peer into them. Let them fall open as they will. Read on from the first sentence that turns the eye. Then turn to another. Make a voyage of discovery, taking soundings of uncharted seas. Set them back on their shelves with your own hands. Arrange them on your own plan, so that if you do not know what is in them, you at least know where they are. If they cannot be your friends, let them at any rate be your acquaintances. If they cannot enter the circle of your life, do not deny them at least a nod of recognition.”

― Winston Churchill, Painting as a Pastime